Reports

Who’s Caring: The State of School-Based Mental Health Care in NYC Schools

A eport opening a window for parents and concerned New Yorkers into the city’s school mental health system. The result of this patchwork system, constructed to take advantage of a variety of funding streams, is a school system with only one social per worker per 800 Manhattan public school students, where dozens of schools go without a single full-time social worker or mental health professional on staff.

Manhattan Supermarkets: How to Keep them Alive

A survey of Manhattan’s supermarkets and grocers with policy recommendations to stem the tide of supermarket closures. The report also includes the Age-Friendly Supermarket Guide, a census of senior-friendly features at 229 Manhattan supermarkets (including wheelchair accessibility, restroom availability, delivery costs, and any available senior discounts).
Civic Innovation Report Cover

New York City's Civic Innovation Fellowship: A program to empower Borough Presidents and Community Boards in the rapidly changing digital environment

The ‚ÄčCivic Innovation Fellowship is a new program launched in 2014 by the Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, fusing her interests in technological advancement, Community Board improvement, and youth development in New York City. Program partners include the Manhattan Borough President’s Office, BetaNYC, the City University of New York (CUNY), and Data and Society Research Institute, with support from the Fund for the City of New York.

ArtsForward: Closing the gaps in arts education in Manhattan public schools

New York State’s requirement that arts instruction be mandatory for every public school student is a powerful endorsement of the arts as an essential component of K-12 education. ArtsForward is the result of a Manhattan Borough President’s Office analysis of DOE Survey data applying to Manhattan schools. Data indicate that arts education across New York City is beset by significant compliance issues—the MBPO probed into Survey results to identify which Manhattan schools need help in delivering arts education to meet state requirements.

 

 

Small Business, Big Impact: Expanding opportunity for Manhattan's storefronters

Launching a small business in New York City has never been easy. Over the past few years, however, the future of the city’s small businesses has begun to look murky. High rents, corporate competition, and real estate development deals are creating challenges over and above the ones small businesses typically face. This report is intended help more small businesses thrive and grow, because small businesses have historically provided the majority of jobs for New Yorkers and a gateway to the middle class.

 

How Our Gardens Grow: Strategies for expanding urban agriculture

Thriving in the back lots, on the rooftops, and in the community centers and the schoolrooms of Manhattan's dense urban environment are more than 170 community gardens plus a vast array of food-producing hydroponics labs, greenhouses, and urban farms. The benefits of urban farming are many and well documented: residents gain a local source of fresh produce, healthier eating habits, and educational opportunities in STEM fields. This report offers recommendations for sustaining and boosting urban agriculture.

 

Accessible Manhattan: Making sidewalks safe & navigable
for all

Since its inception, Manhattan’s street grid spurred unprecedented economic development and personal mobility. However, crumbling concrete and potholes can make navigating the streets problematic even for abled-bodied New Yorkers. For the roughly 600,000 New Yorkers who rely on wheelchairs or walkers or have vision impairments, the dilapidated conditions of Manhattan’s curb cuts—sidewalk cutouts that, when in proper form, allow for a smooth descent into the street—are a serious concern. This report makes recommendations for correcting existing problems and ensuring that all future New York City curb cuts are fully ADA-compliant. (PDF)

 

Improving Police-Community Relations

In Black and Latino neighborhoods of New York, being treated differently and often unfairly because of one’s racial identity is both a historical fact and contemporary reality. In recent years, various forms of racial discrimination in policing became systemic in the NYPD, and it took the Federal Courts to put a stop to some of it. This report reflects the testimony of over a thousand New Yorkers from town halls across Manhattan and Brooklyn, revealing the deep divide between NYPD officers and the communities they serve, and the desire for a renewed trust and respect on both sides.

 

Unlocking the Grid: Strategies to Reduce Vehicle Congestion in Manhattan

Manhattan’s gridlocked traffic is as iconic as Central Park, the Chrysler Building, or the Museum of Modern Art—but a lot less pleasant to be stuck in. The volume of people, cars, trucks, and buses traveling our streets each day is massive, contributing to a host of problems for our borough. In September 2015, I called a public hearing and heard from constituents, advocates and experts. Their ideas, along with proposals for solutions, are an important part of this report.


Copyright The Office of the Manhattan Borough President